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ETFLA - European Task Force for Laboratory Astrophysics

As a recommendation of the ASTRONET Infrastructure Roadmap, it has been decided to establish a European Task Force for Laboratory Astrophysics (ETFLA). Laboratory astrophysics is a rapidly growing international field, particularly because of the fast increase in huge amounts of astronomical data recorded from new instruments, in ground based astronomy as well as from space observatories and/or space probes in the Solar System. To make full use of these data, it has long been recognized that specific laboratory experiments must be dedicated to the interpretation of the observations.

The role of the ETFLA will be first to establish a "reconnaissance" of the various strengths in Europe (laboratories, institutes, major instruments and also personnel, including post-docs and PhD students). ETFLA will assess the potential for European collaborative efforts including "Eastern European countries", and will be in charge of promoting the various fields related to Laboratory Astrophysics, organizing conferences (~ 1 every two years) and workshops (~ 2 per year), establishing a roadmap for prioritizing subjects and helping formulate policy on important developments. Relationships with future generation instruments that will need more scientific and fundamental physics and chemistry input will also be highlighted. There might be also the possibility to provide fellowships and scientific prizes. Above that, the mission of ETFLA is to get fully implemented and recognized in the ASTRONET organization.

The task is thus large and challenging but the action should last for some years, considering the leadership of European laboratories on many issues that are related to Laboratory Astrophysics.  


ETFLA executive committee

  • Chair: Louis d'Hendecourt (Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, France)
  • Co-Chair: Jonathan Tennyson (University College London, UK)